48 Laws of Power vs. Thank You for Arguing Essay

Law 1: Never outshine the master. The first of the 48 ingenious yet complexly simplified example of laws from Roberts Greene’s: The Concise 48 Laws of Power. This book features 48 laws to follow indefinitely in order to reach the absolute state of power in any environment. These laws bend at a person’s will to suit their needs. This book represents that these simplistic easily understood ideas used in everyday situations are the most effective and tactful in an individual’s strive for power. The 48 laws of power is a book that transcends the past words into everyday life.

This book contains 48 ‘laws’ as said, claiming to make a person as famous and as powerful as possible, attainable to the average individual if they are followed. These laws require adjustments to a person’s life, anything as simple as to seem unassuming among those above you, to doing outrageous things to stand out against a crowd. Above all this book teaches to be what you must in front of different people. Disguise your intentions, and learn to adapt to the people around you. Of all these 48 laws, the most effective always seemed to be the most simple.

Law 1: Never Outshine the Master, is by far the simplest and the most easily broken by those who don’t know the consequence. “Always make those above you feel superior. Make your masters appear more brilliant than they are and you will attain the heights of power”. Written elaborately, it basically means to always make those in charge feel smarter than they are. Shower those with power with praise of brilliance and admiration, so they will never expect you underhandedness or your betrayal. Law 1 in this book is the foundation of it.

This is not a step by step manual to reach power, but merely a series of tips to help toward an ongoing goal. Law 1 is correctly labeled, because it is written for those who currently have a ‘master’, those who are not in a position of power, rather they are close enough to be in acquaintance with one who is. Be close to your superior and let the well of compliments and praise never dry, but this book also says, be wary of seeming too eager, because you will seem too superficial and your admiration will no longer be received warmly, that is when you turn into a nuisance. Make your master shine more in the eyes of others, then you are god sent and you will be instantly promoted”. “Use absence to increase respect and honor,” a simple concept that many today many take advantage of. The same politicians and celebrities who are spread across papers and magazines are those who are no longer asked about. Give the public all they need to know, and suddenly that information in no longer needed. It is those celebrities and others who do not appear in the news that stir interest in the public. “The Sun. It can only be appreciated by its absence.

The longer the days of rain, the more the sun is craved. But too many hot days and the sun overwhelms. Learn to keep yourself obscure and make people demand your return. ” Law 16, is one of the most broken is the entertainment and politician world. Obscurity and privacy no longer have a place in society. The most demanded pictures are not the ones of stars and politicians smiling on the red carpet and debates, but the grainy unclear ones, with the subject of the picture unassuming and completely unaware. These unclear pictures stir the most interest and generate the most questions and stories.

The saying goes “too much is too bad” and this applies to just about everything, especially, in an individual’s conversations. “Law 4: Always say less than necessary”. One law that many take for granted, saying too much may fill the gaps in a conversation but it also make a person look nervous and lacking confidence, and above all a person in power must have an air of confidence surrounding them. Incessant speech makes one seem common place and lack control. Saying what needs to be said, while maintaining an aura of mystery and intelligence and insight that other do not possess creates admirers and appreciates.

This skill is one that many do control, and only the gifted can apply it. Short answers and vague responses almost always fill those around you with feelings of unease. In this presence, people will almost always fill these gaps with their own words, muddled words that explain more about themselves and their ideas. Saying less than necessary not only maintains an aura of mystery and insight, it also gives a glimpse of the person on the end of the conversation, their unplanned words will leave them feeling robbed from the conversation, and wondering what they had slipped.

These are just 3 of the laws out of 48, but they do generalize the whole of this book. Law 1, 4 and 16, represent the quality and skill encompassed in a The 48 Laws of Power. This genius of a book has unique ideas that if applied correctly can enhance any one person’s position. These ‘laws’ have truly deserved their name; because they are so essential and must be followed in one wished you rise to power. Reading though this book, these laws seem harsh and too calculated for one to stomach. But the clear-cut of them and their conciseness is where the skill of them lies.

They should never be ignored and one should always be wary if they are being influenced by any of these laws. This book serves both as a manual as well as a reading of the history of power used through the ages. This book can match up to anyone other work of brilliant literature such as Sun Tzu’s The Art of War. The tactics mentioned are manipulative and insensitive; this draws to the appeal of them. Straightforward and curt, “The 48 Laws of Power” deserves to withstand the erosion of time and cross on to future generation.